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Tuesday, 23 August 2016

A RETURN TO FAIRNESS AND DECENCY IN QUEENSLAND.

 

MORE ON QUEENSLAND -
FOLLOWING THE LANDMARK DECISION TO REJECT
THE PRIVATISATION OF PUBLIC HOUSING

Public housing is the last stop. 
Being evicted from public housing leads to homelessness.

Here are some extracts from the Estimates Hearings Committee with some brief comments added. https://www.parliament.qld.gov.au/…/2016_07_20_EstimatesIPC
                                  See p87 onwards

On SOCIAL INCLUSION
 
Mick de Brenni QLD - ALP State Minister for Housing.

“I am very pleased for the opportunity to discuss the progress in the development of a new housing strategy for all Queenslanders.

I start by indicating that the previous governments housing strategy was solely focused on the privatisation of publicly owned housing assets.

This governments housing strategy will be focused on providing more sustainable communities, more sustainable homes, more affordable homes and a more responsive housing system for every Queenslander, regardless of whether you find yourself in the unfortunate circumstance of homelessness or you have been fortunate enough to be supported in public housing; whether you rent a home, whether you own a home, whether you rent a home to somebody else, whether you are a builder, a certifier or an investor. Our housing strategy seeks to engage with people across that breadth of the community”

THE THREE STRIKES EVICTION POLICY
AND THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF PUBLIC TENANTS.

Mick de Brenni -“The previous government's Three Strikes Policy was a gimmick that was aimed at throwing some of the most vulnerable Queenslanders out of their homes”

I have said before that I am proud to be the housing minister and to ensure that people who live in our homes, many of whom have challenging needs around disability, many of whom have mental health challenges, are supported to stay in their home that we have provided them. Simply disregarding their needs and pushing them into homelessness not only is inappropriate but also shows a lack of sophistication and a lack of compassion for people in Queensland."

Very well said.

It would be interesting to find out what happened to vacated public housing properties following evictions ... Did they remain state housing in public hands? Were they given away to Community Housing businesses? Or were they sold off privately ..?? 

“As I said on almost my first day as minister,the introduction of these policies when I announced them, was about no longer treating public housing tenants as second-class citizens”

Mick deBrenni - “I want to outline for the benefit of the committee the basis on which housing policy decisions are now made. They are to ensure natural justice for the tenant to have right of reply, to ensure we do not discriminate against vulnerable people, to ensure that we are reasonable according to legal and legislative definitions, and to ensure we have a human element.”

And“fairness means fairness for everybody”

On DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Mick de Brenni- “When I had coffee with a domestic violence victim, Benita, in my own neighbourhood and I understood how powerful it was for her to know that she would no longer be trapped in a violent household, I knew it was the right thing for our government to do to make it easier for survivors of domestic and family violence to have their names removed from tenancy black lists where those listings were due to the violent behaviour of their partner”
Another excellent move by the Palaszczuk government.

In his summing up,he says,
“This goes back to the comments I made before about the privatisation of public housing. I am very proud to be the Minister for Housing in Queensland. The delivery of an essential service that is as personal as one's home is something that a Labor government feels very strongly about.” 

Unfortunately not all Labor governments in all states- nor Labor politicians federally...

Throughout the Estimates Hearing transcript, Minister de Brenni talks about the comprehensive consultation undertaken by his government. It is obvious that he consults widely and actually listens to the people who are most impacted by the housing crisis.

Subsequently people are keen to talk to him, since housing is an issue that affects us all.

Meanwhile in Victoria the ALP Housing Minister, Martin Foley, is being bitterly accused of just the opposite - not engaging with, and listening to the people who are being hit the hardest by the housing crisis,and those who have the most to lose - homeless people and public tenants.










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